Skills Assessment

Skills assessment for Australian migration

If you have veterinary qualifications which are generally recognised for the purpose of registration in Australia and New Zealand you may apply direct to the veterinary board in your state or territory or New Zealand.

If you are applying in Australia for a visa which requires a completed skills assessment you will need to apply to AVBC. AVBC is the government gazetted organisation for assessing the occupation Veterinarian in Australia. For New Zealand applicants, please contact the Veterinary Council of New Zealand direct.

AVBC can only provide advice on applying for a Skills Assessment. All other questions relating to migration and visas should be directed to the Department of Home Affairs.

Background

To migrate to Australia under a points-tested skilled migration category one of the requirements is to nominate an occupation from the list of eligible skilled occupations which fits your skills and qualifications, and have your skills and qualifications assessed by the relevant assessing authority.

The AVBC has been specified, in accordance with the Migration Regulations 1994, as the assessing authority for the occupation “Veterinarian” (ANZSCO Code 234711). If your nominated occupation is “veterinarian”, the AVBC is the only relevant assessing authority that can issue you with an assessment of your skills and qualifications to determine if they are suitable for the occupation of veterinarian for migration purposes.

AVBC will assess your skills as “suitable” or “not suitable” for your nominated occupation against the requirements it has established.

Am I ready to apply for skills assessment?

If you can answer yes to all of the following, you are ready to apply for a skills assessment.

1. Is your qualification on the list of qualifications generally recognised?

2. English requirements (n.b. this requirement also applies to graduates from Australian veterinary schools):

a. are you a native speaker of English, born and educated in Australia, the UK, Ireland, Canada, USA, NZ or South Africa? OR

In a single test sitting
b. have you achieved a minimum score of Band 7 in each section of the IELTS (Academic module)? OR

c. have you achieved at least a B pass or a score of 350 in each section of the OET? OR

d. have you achieved scores in the TOEFL-iBT of at least 24 in Listening, 24 in Reading, 27 in Writing and 23 in Speaking? OR

e. have you achieved scores in the PTE academic of at least 65 in the four communicative skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking).

3. Have you registered with an Australian state or territory veterinary registration board?

4. Have you gathered all relevant documents and certified copies as listed on the checklist?

5. Have you decided whether or not you need an assessment of further veterinary qualifications or professional employment experience? If so, have you gathered the relevant documents?

Additional information for candidates applying for a Skills Assessment

Registration

If you intend to work as a veterinarian in Australia you must be registered with the veterinary registration board of the state or territory in which you are working. To be eligible to apply for registration you must either:

My qualification does not appear on the list

If you are an overseas trained veterinarian and your qualifications are not immediately eligible to apply for registration, you will need to successfully complete the Australasian Veterinary Examination before you can obtain a skills assessment.

Australian graduates

Please note that under immigration law, you will need to apply for a skills assessment whether your qualifications were gained overseas or from an Australian tertiary institution.

Potential employment

Successfully migrating to Australia as a Veterinarian is no guarantee of employment in Australia as a veterinarian.

European Graduates

Whilst it is true that many graduates from European Veterinary Schools are eligible to work in the United Kingdom under European Community Directive 78/1016/EEC, this directive is not recognised in Australia.

English

A comprehensive knowledge of English is essential to the practice of veterinary science in Australia. Native speakers of English, born and educated in Australia, the UK, Ireland, Canada, USA, New Zealand or South Africa may apply for exemption from the OET/IELTS/TOEFL-iBT English language test.

If your first language is not English, at least a B pass or a score of 350 in each section of the Occupational English Test, or a score of Band 7 in each section of the academic module of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or scores in the TOEFL-iBT of at least 24 in Listening, 24 in Reading, 27 in Writing and 23 in Speaking or a score of at least 65 in the four communicative skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) of the PTE academic will satisfy the requirements. Should you fail to achieve the required standard in one of these examinations, you must re-sit the entire examination. The AVBC does not permit re-sits of sub-sections of any English examination.

A Summary of the English Language Skills required by AVBC can be found here.

Application for a skills assessment

If you are seeking to apply for migration to Australia under the General Skilled Migration program, you should complete the skills assessment application form.

You should use this form to apply for an assessment of your skills and qualifications to determine if they are suitable for the occupation of Veterinarian for migration purposes.

You should carefully read the Explanatory Notes to the Application then complete the application form and send it together with the documentation listed therein and the fee by post to:

Australasian Veterinary Boards Councils Inc (AVBC Inc)
Level 8, 470 Collins Street
Melbourne, VICTORIA 3000
AUSTRALIA

Payment options are: credit card, money order, direct deposit or bank cheque in Australian dollars.

If you wish to pay by direct deposit, our bank details can be obtained by contacting

Tel: (03) 9620 7844 or

Email: nve”at”avbc.asn.au (please use the @ instead of “at”)